One of the New Hampshire Grants, Middlebury was chartered by Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth on November 2, 1761. The name “Middlebury” came from its location between the towns of Salisbury and New Haven.[6] It was awarded to John Evarts and 62 others. The French and Indian Wars ended in 1763, and the first settlers arrived in 1766. John Chipman was the first to clear his land, Lot Seven.[7] During the Revolutionary War, much of the town was burned in Carleton’s Raid on November 6, 1778. After the war concluded in 1783, settlers returned to rebuild homes, clear forests and establish farms. Principal crops were grains and hay.

Middlebury College is a private liberal arts college located in Middlebury, Vermont. Founded in 1800, it is one of the oldest liberal arts colleges in the United States. Drawing 2,526 undergraduates from all 50 states and 74 countries, Middlebury offers 44 majors in the arts, humanities, literature, foreign languages, social sciences, and natural sciences. Middlebury follows a 4–1–4 academic calendar, with two four-course semesters and a one-course January term.

Middlebury is the first American institution of higher education to have granted a bachelor’s degree to an African-American, graduating Alexander Twilight in the class of 1823.[3] Middlebury was also one of the first formerly all-male liberal arts colleges in New England to become a coeducational institution, following the trustees’ decision in 1883 to accept women. Middlebury has an acceptance rate of 17.0% and was listed as the fourth-best liberal arts college in the U.S. in the 2016 U.S. News & World Report rankings.[4][5]